The Blind Football League in Uganda

Meet the man who introduced blind football to Uganda

Luganda, the land of the blind, is the home to a football team (and many blind people – it’s the highest number of people with sight in Africa) that has given the sport a much needed shot in the arm.

By Chika Okello

Luganda, the land of the blind, is the home to a football team (and many blind people – it’s the highest number of people with sight in Africa) that has given the sport a much needed shot in the arm.

Last year, the East African nation introduced its first ever football league featuring national teams from countries across the continent.

The Football Association of Uganda (FU) was among the first to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with the International Blind Football Federation (IBFF) in December 2010.

The goal was to make football accessible to everyone and to promote the sport and its values through participation in the nation’s first ever blind football league.

It was an ambitious goal and the IBFF has worked with the FU to create an inclusive football programme that was open to all categories of people with disability.

The FU has worked with the IBFF to develop a programme of training for coaches and members of the Uganda National Team as well as for blind footballers who were training with them.

And this week marks the start of the league’s inaugural season, in which 12 teams will be competing to earn the club trophy, with the teams playing in a round-robin format.

Football has always been a key part of any society’s culture, and it is now considered to be the fastest growing sports in the world.

This is in part because of the positive social change it brings about, and despite the prevalence of football in our country, there has been virtually no awareness or promotion of the game in Uganda.

But the FU’s efforts to promote football to all of Uganda is about more than just blind people.

They are also aimed at those people who are usually not encouraged to take up this sport, whether it’s because they are physically unable to participate or because they are culturally uncomfortable with it.

“We believe that the FU’s role is to empower people to play the sport,” says FU president Alfred Kasozi in an interview with Mzukiswa.

“And if we can

Leave a Comment