The leaks of the environmental impact assessment show damage to the Baltic Sea

Video shows Nord Stream 1 damage

The German energy company, Wintershall, has admitted to leaking documents showing what it calls “serious and ongoing damage” to the natural reserves at the Baltic Sea, including the world’s largest freshwater lake, in the Baltic Sea.

The documents, which contain photographs of the impact of drilling operations on the Baltic Sea, have been shared with the media. They show, among other things, the impact of drilling operations on the lake’s surface layer.

Wintershall called the leaks of the documents “unacceptable” and withdrew its commitment to the Baltic Sea project in June this year.

This is not the first time that the leaks of the documents have come to light. Previously, the leaks were also released by environmental groups in Germany including Greenpeace. The leaked documents show:

A huge impact of drill work on the Baltic Sea’s surface layer, which lies between 2 and 60 millimetres below the sea’s surface. The documents were released by German environmental group Stuttgarter Welle.

Damage on the lake’s bottom, which could be measured in metres.

Unprecedented damage to the Baltic Sea’s salt content which could be measured in kilograms.

A loss of the lake’s water, which could be measured in cubic metres.

Italians say there is no problem with the project but the German government has refused to comment.

The first part of a new environmental impact assessment was issued in 2015 by the German Federal Agency for Nature Conservation (WBN), before the decision by Wintershall to call off the project. The second part of the assessment, with the second batch of the leaked documents, was issued today by the agency’s successor, the German Federal Office for the Environment.

The third part of the assessment, with the third batch of the leaked documents, is to be released by the end of this year. The fourth part of the assessment will be launched late next year, with the next batch of documents to be released in the first quarter of 2020.

The first assessment did not rule out any possible impact of the planned project on the

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